POLARION
Managing Functional Safety (ISO 26262) in Automotive Projects.

LIVE WEBINAR

JULY 11th 2 PM BST

Customer Stories

Polarion Flexability & 

Accessibilty

Stefano Scala | Fiat

"Polarion offers flexibility in configuring the projects that gives the possibility to follow best practices, company workflows and this helps engineers to act according these practices in a guided way."

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“ With Polarion ALM requirements
management we found the solution to both of
our biggest pain points: achieving SPICE
compliance and enabling us to seamlessly fit
into the OEM supply chain.”

Manage Complex Requirements with Ease

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Christian Posluschni | Kuster Automotive


Requirements  Managment & Product  Complexity

ENGINEERING.COM REPORT

In late 2018, engineering.com surveyed 246 design and engineering professionals to ask them about the changing complexity of their products, and how the requirements caused by those changes are being managed.

An overwhelming portion (92%) reported their products increased in complexity over the last five years. Leading causes were mechanical designs becoming more intricate (57%), more electronics (47%) and new materials (43%).

Despite the increasing complexity, only 15% of respondents relied on a dedicated requirements management system. This was either causally linked or a likely factor in the following reported negative outcomes:


• Production outcome failures (83%)
• Reprimands by a regulatory agency (62%)
• A minority reporting they feel they effectively manage requirements (34%)

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Join our live webinar and learn  how Automotive  OEMs and Suppliers are achieving functional Safety in ISO 26262, Automotive SPICE, and CMMI Compliance, Faster and more Effectively. 

DOWNLOAD THE FULL REPORT

What is this about 

As Benjamin Franklin said, “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail”.

Automotive vehicle systems are becoming more complex. It is critical to identify and eliminate risks of hardware and software failures to ensure driver and passenger safety is maintained at the highest level.

Historically the automotive industry has been oriented mainly towards mechanical engineering. This has changed and we now see significant growth in electronics and software presence in automotive systems. Electrification and vehicle automation are the primary drivers of these new challenges.

To be successful in this changing landscape, automotive companies need to effectively integrate traditional mechanical engineering with electronics and software whilst implementing functional safety requirements such as ISO 26262.

An integrated Application Lifecycle Management process is important in designing and delivering high-quality, reliable and compliant software and mechatronic systems.


Konstantin has over 20 years of software development experience and setting up Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) and Application Lifecycle Management (ALM) systems. Actively involved in helping companies achieve excellence in Software projects, Mechatronic projects. Provides consultancy and support for Automotive Industry, including Functional Safety.

What you will learn

In this webinar we will look at

  • Introduction to Application Lifecycle Management
  • Introduction to Functional Safety
  • Functional Safety Management and Safety Lifecycle
  • Process Model of the ISO 26262
  • Concept Phase: Item, Risk, and ASIL
  • Functional Safety Development at System-Level
  • Overview of Hardware and Software Development according to ISO 26262

FURTHER INFORMATION & READING

Register for the Live Webinar

The Presenter

Konstantin Klioutchinski
POLARION ALM Consultant at GARANTIS IT Solutions

Who should Attend

  • Head of Engineering
  • Engineering Managers
  • Operations Directors
  • Systems Engineers
  • Project Engineers
  • Software Architect
  • CTO
  • Head of Functional Safety
  • Software Manager

What is this about 

As Benjamin Franklin said, “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail”.

Automotive vehicle systems are becoming more complex. It is critical to identify and eliminate risks of hardware and software failures to ensure driver and passenger safety is maintained at the highest level.

Historically the automotive industry has been oriented mainly towards mechanical engineering. This has changed and we now see significant growth in electronics and software presence in automotive systems. Electrification and vehicle automation are the primary drivers of these new challenges.

To be successful in this changing landscape, automotive companies need to effectively integrate traditional mechanical engineering with electronics and software whilst implementing functional safety requirements such as ISO 26262.

An integrated Application Lifecycle Management process is important in designing and delivering high-quality, reliable and compliant software and mechatronic systems.

What you will learn

In this webinar we will look at

  • Introduction to Application Lifecycle Management
  • Introduction to Functional Safety
  • Functional Safety Management and Safety Lifecycle
  • Process Model of the ISO 26262
  • Concept Phase: Item, Risk, and ASIL
  • Functional Safety Development at System-Level
  • Overview of Hardware and Software Development according to ISO 26262

Konstantin has over 20 years of software development experience and setting up Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) and Application Lifecycle Management (ALM) systems. Actively involved in helping companies achieve excellence in Software projects, Mechatronic projects. Provides consultancy and support for Automotive Industry, including Functional Safety.

Requirements  Managment & Product  Complexity

ENGINEERING.COM REPORT

In late 2018, engineering.com surveyed 246 design and engineering professionals to ask them about the changing complexity of their products, and how the requirements caused by those changes are being managed.

An overwhelming portion (92%) reported their products increased in complexity over the last five years. Leading causes were mechanical designs becoming more intricate (57%), more electronics (47%) and new materials (43%).

Despite the increasing complexity, only 15% of respondents relied on a dedicated requirements management system. This was either causally linked or a likely factor in the following reported negative outcomes:

• Production outcome failures (83%)
• Reprimands by a regulatory agency (62%)
• A minority reporting they feel they effectively manage requirements (34%)

Customer Stories